Confessions of an ex race junkie

My name is Hanna and I used to race every weekend.

Or every other weekend.

Ok, I wrote every other weekend just to make you think I wasn’t a junkie. I was. Big time.

I don’t know where are you in your running history but for most of us it goes like this:

  • You start running, God knows why, and you suffer. No breath, crampy legs, the struggle is real
  • The struggle is less painful
  • You still suck at running but somehow you enjoy it and becomes your thing. You may even meet other people who enjoy the same type of masochism.
  • You sign up for your first race and even though it’s stressful the adrenaline, going for the race, all the rituals before and after, seeing your friends makes it the best thing ever.
  • You’re officially hooked

Maybe you’ve been there or maybe you’re heading there,I’m not in a Race Town anymore. I’m actually trying to get back but let me tell you why I don’t live there anymore

It’s pretty stressful. Even if you tell yourself it’s only just for fun and you won’t give your all, that the race is just a part of training. The adrenaline is contagious and there’s no way you won’t be at least a bit nervous. Your ‘fight-or-flight’ mode will inevitably kick in. Imagine living this every weekend. Waking up Sunday morning with that tingle in the stomach..You’re only racing against yourself but…

It’s not the way you want to train. Some runs are easy, some are faster. If you race instead of training you’ll always give 100% instead of taking it easy. Then if you race you should recover the week after.

Once you recover you race again which means you never train, you just rest and recover. You will have a wall full of medals but few PR’s.

Can I get a mortgage for this? You might race close to home but it will cost you money and time. Races are getting more and more popular and even if you plan ahead traveling for races can damage your budget.

Racing is a lifestyle. If  you want to live that way, that’s ok just bear in mind you have to organize everything around it. No more lazy weekend mornings, either you travel for a race or you wake up early to go on a start line. No brunch or Sunday roast with non running friends (do you still have non running friends?) Then you recover so Sunday afternoon is quite different as well: cold baths, foam rolling or legs up against the wall. But you decline most of the invitations for the weekend anyway, racing, remember?

Someone said: injury? Recovery and steady training makes you less prone to injuries, needless to say racing all the time is not. Plus after the race you body is weaker also in term of immunity and you can get sick quite easily.

I think the main reason I quit compulsive racing was stress and being exhausted all the time. Plus I wanted to bring my running on the next level and constant racing wasn’t helping at that. Instead of getting faster I started to become slower and irritated.

I’m not sure if there are a lot of addicts like I used to be, for sure not having a family on your own can limit the damage in the first place, I mean you want to and have to spend time and money on your loved ones as a priority. Otherwise you can slip quite easily into the new lifestyle which is being away every weekend and collecting bibs.

Are you addicted to racing? Maybe you used to? Why dis you quit?

What do you love about racing?

Any race on your calendar?

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